NEWS

 

Girl-On-A-Bike Films is the Production Company created in 2009 by New Zealand filmmaker Kirsty MacDonald.




For information on her films

BLACK AND WHITE

and

ASSUME NOTHING

please enter...

 

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DOCUMENTARY FEATURE JURY AWARD -

ASSUME NOTHING

“Assume Nothing provides a behind-the-scenes look at the relationship between photographer and subject and speaks

to complex issues of queerness and representation.

Beautiful cinematography and masterful editing rounded 

out this superb film.”                                                             

aGLIFF 2010 -                                                                        

Austin Gay and Lesbian International Film Festival, USA



…Suspends all conventional definitions of gender and sexuality and creates a free-floating borderless realm that celebrates difference, in all its contradiction and complexity…Like its subjects, Assume Nothing refuses to be confined to the normal rules of the documentary form and riotously combines rainbow-flavoured animation, Super-8 footage, family photos, body parts and gender theory--everything both public and private--into a celebration of dynamic and continually evolving humanism. A warm, funny and wonderfully candid film.

2009 Vancouver International Film Festival Programme,(Canada) 


NOVEMBER 2012.


GREETINGS, IT HAS BEEN SO LONG SINCE I UPDATED THIS PAGE...HOW HAVE YOU BEEN?!

In no particular order, here are a few of the projects I’ve been working on since early 2011.




























































                                                                                                                                                                                                           

                                                                                                                   

The silent performance video work entitled "Siva in motion" (2012) by performance artist Shigeyuki Kihara is an

extension of Kihara’s recent solo dance performance and video work entitled "Taualuga: the last dance" (2005).

“Siva in motion” was commissioned by the Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, New Zealand.

Concept leader, performer and director - Shigeyuki Kihara.
DOP & Camera - Rebecca Swan.
Creative Producer & Editor - Kirsty MacDonald.
Hair & Wardrobe assistance - Lindah Lepou and Louina Fifita-Fa'apo.


























“Galu Afi: Waves of Fire” (2012) is a sister work to Shigeyuki Kihara’s "Siva in motion". The choreography of both

films is based upon stories told to Kihara in Samoa about the devastating tsunami in 2009. "Galu Afi: Waves of Fire"

won the 2012 Paramount Award of the 21st Wallace Art Awards - New Zealand’s premier national art competition.


Concept leader, performer and director - Shigeyuki Kihara.
DOP & Camera - Rebecca Swan.
Creative Producer & Editor - Kirsty MacDonald.
Hair & Wardrobe assistance - Lindah Lepou and Louina Fifita-Fa'apo.



























"Landshapes" is a modest assemblage of new and

recent work looking at man-altered landscapes

and some of the controlled elements within the

landscape. The exhibition includes a film/sculpture

work "Skins" made in collaboration with filmmaker

Kirsty MacDonald, exploring aspects of identity

and transformation referencing landscape and the

body.


Filmed on an i-phone at Whitespace Gallery Auckland.

Paintings: Grant Whibley

Music track acknowledgement: Arvo Part -

"Spiegel im Spiegel" for violin and piano -

Tasmin Little and Martin Roscoe

(from the album "The Very Best of Arvo Part" EMI Records).


For more information about Steve's work please visit:

http://www.whitespace.co.nz/artists/steve-woodward.aspx

http://www.whitespace.co.nz/exhibitions/steve-woodward-2011.aspx

http://stephen.woodward.free.fr/







In "Skins" many of the sequences are animations of

the still photographs of 19th Century photographer

Eadweard Muybridge. These closely observed gestures

of 19th century men and women spill onto and radiate

from the membrane of the land.


The surface of the limestone is carved in varying

degrees of relief to suggest both actual landscape

(“altered" or “natural") and the human body in ways

that are sensual and yet ambiguous. At times as the

images dance across the stone, the limestone seems

to lose its solidity even while the valleys and ridges of

the landscape below interact with the elemental and

human forms.


There is no audio, the film plays on the sculpture in

any day-to-day sound environment... (Reference film).






















































































October 2011. “Assume Nothing” screens as part of “Crossing Identities”: Special Programme with films from the last 15 years of Animadok at DOK Leipzig, Germany.