EXCERPTS (Full articles Below):


…Suspends all conventional definitions of gender and sexuality and creates a free-floating borderless realm that celebrates difference, in all its contradiction and complexity…Like its subjects, Assume Nothing refuses to be confined to the normal rules of the documentary form and riotously combines rainbow-flavoured animation, Super-8 footage, family photos, body parts and gender theory--everything both public and private--into a celebration of dynamic and continually evolving humanism. A warm, funny and wonderfully candid film.

VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL PROGRAMME (Canada) 2009



“Assume Nothing" is not just another film about transsexuality or cross-gender. It's about every one of us, about the lifelong adventure of finding one's one identity. And above all it's something you wouldn't expect: full of joy, courage and - particularly in its artistic expression - surprises.

DR GRIT LEMKE - PROGRAMMER DOK LEIPZIG (GERMANY) 2009



A joyous celebration and exploration of the lives of five gender variant New Zealanders…In the same way the rapport between Rebecca Swan and her photographic subjects is clear from the way she captures their beauty and strength, so Assume Nothing brings out the best in its participants by treating them with care and empathy. The result is a joyous, positive celebration of transgender lives created through a collage of Super8, fun animations, family photos, body parts and gender theory. JB                                                                                      

24TH BFI LONDON LESBIAN AND GAY FILM FESTIVAL PROGRAMME (UK) 2010


…Assume Nothing paints an artful, intimate portrait of five gender-variant artists of Maori, Samoan-Japanese, and Pakeha descent. The artists featured in both the book and the film use their creativity to communicate a visual personal history of masculinity, femininity, androgyny, drag, intersex, transgenderism and transgression from prescribed social ideals of a gender binary, specifically from a South Pacific perspective.Still photographs, animation and personal interviews create a holistic portrayal of both the subjects of the film and the director's point of view on those who exist outside gender norms. Assume Nothing lends an intimate and aesthetic voice to the features of our identities that cannot always be described with words.                       

20TH ANNIVERSARY INSIDE OUT LGBT FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL PROGRAMME (Canada) 2010



…Kirsty MacDonald’s Assume Nothing, point[s] to a new kind of contract between documentary filmmakers and their subjects, based on negotiation and a degree of shared control over the creative process. In MacDonald’s film, lush animation is interspersed between interviews with five trans-gender artists of Maori, Samoan-Japanese, and European descent, each of them very savvy about how images are used to control and define identity.

EXCERPT FROM FESTIVAL REPORT: DOK LEIPZIG 2009, RYAN PROUT

(Full article at http://www.filmint.nu/?q=node/197  )



    Absolutely beautiful documentary...we are presented with discussions on gender identity as the film creates and showcases imagery and language to reflect back non-binary gender presentations. I loved the openness of the film and that it not only discussed but also defined, presented and created imagery and celebrated words that crossed over from the gulf of the limited thinking. It walk[s] the walk and talks the talk, as well as being beautiful from start to finish.

moviemoxie.blogspot.com



    It's an intimate look inside some of the most personal aspects of identity.

Highly recommended.

FILM QUEEN REVIEWS



    On voit dans le film que le genre n’est pas lié à son corps (de naissance) et que chacun devrait pouvoir choisir comment il se définit. Il existe déjà d’autres mots pour d’autres identités de genre, trans, transgenre, mais aussi butch, fem, trannybutch, etc… Et puis au fond on est tous des êtres humains, quel que soit notre corps, notre genre, notre couleur de peau, notre origine,… c’est aussi ce que le film montre.

PROPOS RECUEILLIS PAR ORIANE

http://www.mag-paris.fr/Assume-Nothing-un-film.html




FULL ARTICLES:


    The debut feature documentary from New Zealander Kirsty MacDonald, ASSUME NOTHING paints an artful, intimate portrait of five gender-variant artists of Maori, Samoan-Japanese, and Pakeha descent. Featuring captivating and provocative images from photographer Rebecca Swan's book of the same name, ASSUME NOTHING explores the dynamics between our inner identities and our external manifestations of gender, and the ways in which these affect the potent world of creative expression. Swan's use of collage and the merging of dual images provide a visual jumping-off point for a frank and compassionate examination of the countless variations on maleness and femaleness.

    Swan describes her notion of a gender spectrum as a spherical, mobile continuum, citing specifically the limitations of language on a complete expression of one's gender. The artists featured in both the book and the film use their creativity to communicate a visual personal history of masculinity, femininity, androgyny, drag, intersex, transgenderism and transgression from prescribed social ideals of a gender binary, specifically from a South Pacific perspective.

    Still photographs, animation and personal interviews create a holistic portrayal of both the subjects of the film and the director's point of view on those who exist outside gender norms. ASSUME NOTHING lends an intimate and aesthetic voice to the features of our identities that cannot always be described with words.                                                                                           

20TH ANNIVERSARY INSIDE OUT LGBT FILM AND VIDEO FESTIVAL PROGRAMME  (Canada) 2010



    A joyous celebration and exploration of the lives of five gender variant New Zealanders: ASSUME NOTHING poses the questions: ‘What if male and female are not the only options? How do other genders express themselves through art?' Using Rebecca Swan's beautiful photographs of gender variant New Zealanders as a starting point, this warm, funny and candid documentary delves beyond the surface to look at the lives of five alternative gender artists of Maori, Samoan-Japanese and Pakeha-European decent. In the same way the rapport between Rebecca Swan and her photographic subjects is clear from the way she captures their beauty and strength, so ASSUME  NOTHING brings out the best in its participants by treating them with care and empathy. The result is a joyous, positive celebration of transgender lives... JB                                                                                

24TH BFI LONDON LESBIAN AND GAY FILM FESTIVAL PROGRAMME (UK) 2010



    What if "male" and "female" are not the only options? How do other genders express themselves through art? Inspired by the work of New Zealand photographer Rebecca Swan's book of the same title, Kirsty MacDonald's documentary ASSUME NOTHING does exactly that... Namely it suspends all conventional definitions of gender and sexuality and creates a free-floating borderless realm that celebrates difference, in all its contradiction and complexity. In seeking to expand the traditional duality of male/female, the film explores the work and personal experiences of five different gender artists of Maori, Samoan-Japanese, and Pakeha descent including: Jack Byrne, a founding member of the Drag Kings comedy troupe; visual artist Shigeyuki Kihara, a Samoan/Japanese-born Fa'a fafine (meaning a person who embodies both male and female aspects); performer Ema Lyon; intersex activist Mani Bruce Mitchell; and Rebecca Swan herself. Like its subjects, ASSUME NOTHNG refuses to be confined to the normal rules of the documentary form and riotously combines rainbow-flavoured animation, Super-8 footage, family photos, body parts and gender theory--everything both public and private--into a celebration of dynamic and continually evolving humanism. A warm, funny and wonderfully candid film.


VANCOUVER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL PROGRAMME (Canada) 2009




    [...]Shira Avni uses animation to bring to life thoughts about independent living shared with the filmmakers by a group of people with Down’s syndrome. Praised by the jury for its aesthetic ingenuity, the film’s combination of photography and animation allows Avni’s subjects to speak for themselves, and for their individual personalities to emerge from the layering of their own drawings and stories. Like Antoine, Laura Bari’s film about a blind five year old detective (awarded a Talent Dove), Tying Your Own Shoes  eschews the rhetoric of pity to tell a story made instead with empathy. These titles, like Kirsty MacDonald’s ASSUME NOTHING, point to a new kind of contract between documentary filmmakers and their subjects, based on negotiation and a degree of shared control over the creative process. In MacDonald’s film, lush animation is interspersed between interviews with five trans-gender artists of Maori, Samoan-Japanese, and European descent, each of them very savvy about how images are used to control and define identity.


EXCERPT FROM FESTIVAL REPORT: DOK LEIPZIG 2009

Ryan Prout teaches film and writing in the Department of Hispanic Studies, Cardiff University. (Full article at http://www.filmint.nu/?q=node/197 )



« Assume Nothing » : un film emblématique du Queer


Pour moi, ce documentaire met bien en lumière en quoi le genre ne se définit plus de manière binaire, mais comme une palette d’identités et de nuances allant du masculin au féminin. Comment se définir, alors, si l’identité de genre n’est pas binaire ?


    Je pense que le film fait bien passer le message que la binarité de genre homme/femme est trop réductrice au regard des multitudes d’identités qui existent. Je crois à l’auto-définition de chacun : homme/femme sont des constructions sociales, auxquelles on associe des valeurs que potentiellement tout être humain a en lui. On voit dans le film que le genre n’est pas lié à son corps (de naissance) et que chacun devrait pouvoir choisir comment il se définit. Il existe déjà d’autres mots pour d’autres identités de genre, trans, transgenre, mais aussi butch, fem, trannybutch, etc… Et puis au fond on est tous des êtres humains, quel que soit notre corps, notre genre, notre couleur de peau, notre origine,… c’est aussi ce que le film montre.


Les personnes qui nous sont présentées en photo et en vidéo ici ne sont ni à proprement parler des femmes, ni à proprement parler des hommes. Qu’est-ce que son travail peut selon toi apporter à la vision des gens ?

    Le film montre une palette très large de corps différents, certains comme les trans’ ont modifié leurs corps entièrement par choix, d’autres y sont arrivés parce qu’atteints de maladies ou encore parce que nés dans des corps différents. Dans le cas où ça n’est pas un choix à la base, c’est souvent vécu comme une souffrance parce que la société impose des modèles de corps et qu’il est toujours difficile de sortir des normes de la société. C’est ce que j’aime dans son travail, elle montre un tas de personnes différentes, qui sont sorties des normes et elle fait passer le message que, quelle qu’en soit les raisons, et quel que soit le corps qu’on a, on reste des êtres humains et personne n’a le droit de nous juger ou d’essayer de nous assigner de force dans une case dans laquelle on ne veut pas rentrer. Et en même temps il y a ce message positif à l’attention des personnes qui vont vivre leur modification corporelle comme une mutilation de dire regardez, il y en a d’autres et ce sont des corps qui sont magnifiques. Elle prône tout simplement la réappropriation de son propre corps, ce qui à l’heure actuelle dans la société est encore tabou ! Elle dit ça à propos de son travail et je trouve que c’est très bien résumé : « ‘‘Assume Nothing’’ challenges the judgements that we all have to some extent, about those who are different from us, and inspires daring in us all to act on our desires. »



Rebecca Swan met les corps en scène dans ses photos. Dans son film, on croise une personne qui fait beaucoup de performances en public. Pourquoi cette démarche artistique semble-elle aller de pair avec l’identité et le mouvement Queer ?


    Le mouvement Queer a besoin et cherche à faire de la visibilité sur des corps, des identités différents pour casser cette binarité artificielle homme/femme dans laquelle on ne veut pas vivre. Dans cette visibilité l’art a une place centrale parce justement il permet de montrer des corps différents d’un corps complètement « normé ». Il y a plusieurs vecteurs possibles, photos, films, shows… La performance en public est un moyen de toucher, mais aussi de surprendre les gens, et du coup peut-être de toucher un public plus large. Quand on va voir un film ou une expo photo on en connaît déjà le sujet, quand on va à un festival où il y a différentes performances, on ne sait pas forcément exactement ce qu’il va y avoir comme show. Se faire surprendre et voir un « mec » sur scène qui finit nu et montre un corps sans sexe d’homme, peut confronter des personnes à cette réalité de corps différents sans qu’eux-mêmes ne se soient jamais posé de question sur ces thèmes là. Même si une bonne partie de ces performances restent dans un milieu « averti », certainEs en sortent et font quelque part le même travail que ce que fait Rebecca avec son film.


Quel rapport entre Transworld, le film qui a été projeté en introduction (réalisé par Bradley Fayki), et Assume Nothing ?

    « Assume Nothing », en présentant des corps et des identités différentes de ce que le majorité des gens connaît, à savoir homme ou femme, fait de la visibilité sur le mouvement Queer et sur d’autres identités, dont les transidentités. Le projet de Bradley est lui justement plus axé sur les trans’, il veut montrer la diversité des personnes trans, de façon internationale. Rebecca montre aussi des trans’ mais son travail est plus large. On a pensé que pour le T-DOR, qui est le jour de commémoration des victimes trans’ dans le monde, le film de Bradley présentait bien la séance et quelque part faisait le lien avec le long métrage. Bradley : « Je veux faire ce film pour montrer une vision du « genre » transboys, à l’intérieur et hors de l’Europe. Ce qui est intéressant ici, c’est de porter un éclairage sur les différences culturelles, les moeurs et les lois d’un pays à l’autre vis-à-vis des transsexuels. »

PROPOS RECUEILLIS PAR ORIANE

http://www.mag-paris.fr/Assume-Nothing-un-film.html



In a South Pacific nation comprised of many cultures, the diversity that comprises the transgender worldwide family is captured by the artistry of Rebecca Swan.
    The New Zealand photographer combines parallel artistic, activist and gender transformative processes in her work. Swan’s personal and spiritual connection to the gender variant talent makes each photograph more of a progression than an image. Her understanding of the complexity of the gender spectrum (she describes it as “spherical”) takes her work to the next level. “Assume Nothing” delves deeper into those represented in Swan’s artwork as she collaborates with individuals who are given control over their representation.
    Intersex activist, Mani Bruce Mitchell, shares with us hir personal memories of childhood through rare photographs taken in the 1950s. Theatrical performer, Ema Lyon, reflects on androgynous life experiences, including pregnancy, and introduces the gender neutral Maori pronoun “ia” and indigenous queer term “takataapui.” Transgender human rights activist and poet, Jack Byrne, offers Pakeha (NZ born of European descent) perspective of his aptitude as both a drag king and drag queen. Accomplished Japanese-Samoan fa’afafine art photographer, Shigeyuki Kihara, expresses that cisgenderism is the alternative gender identity to transgenderism, and not the other way around.
    This film is a pioneering effort from a small country geographically isolated from progressive politics. In a natural paradise, we are encouraged to “Assume Nothing”.


TEXAS STARR - FRAMELINE33 PROGRAMME (USA) 2009





“Venus Animation” from Assume Nothing

“Ia Animation” from Assume Nothing

“Intersex Animation” from Assume Nothing


 

Press

aGLIFF23 Documentary Feature Award Jury Statement:                                                      Assume Nothing” provides a behind-the-scenes look at the relationship between photographer and subject and speaks to complex issues of queerness and representation. Beautiful cinematography and masterful editing rounded out this superb film.”                                                                                                                                      AUSTIN GAY AND LESBIAN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (USA) 2010